Archive for Medical Studies (click here)

Symptoms of Diabetes Can Be Helped By Low Glycemic Recipes

  • Excessive thirst
  • Frequent urination
  • Increased fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Blurry vision
  • Extreme hunger
  • Unusual weight loss

If you have one or more of these symptoms, see your doctor right away. Ask him if he has studied the effects of low glycemic recipes for people with diabetes. Ask him about using low glycemic recipes as part of your lifestyle to prevent diabetes complications. Go ahead, ask him. Then ask yourself. Take a look at some of the research. You are worth it.

Even if you don’t have diabetes, you have a health problem if you carry too many pounds. You already demonstrate your willingness to learn to better care for yourself by taking the time to read this article. You know you are worth it, and you are the only one who will do it for you. Being better informed provides you with the facts you need to make your best decisions. At LowGlycemicRecipes.net, we bring you some of the most relevant and up-to-date information available. Go ahead, read on to learn more.

In a study at the University of Sydney, scientists found that low glycemic foods help in weight reduction. They did what is known as a “meta-analysis” – a study of other studies, in this case, six randomized controlled trials that compared a low GI diet to other diets including high GI diets.

They concluded:  Lowering the glycemic load of the diet appears to be an effective method of promoting weight loss and improving lipid profiles and can be simply incorporated into a person’s lifestyle”—Thomas EE, Elliott EJ, & Baur L., Cochrane Database System Reviews 2007 July 18;(3):CD005105.

 

Posted by on October 13th, 2008

Here’s Proof that Low Glycemic Eating Helps Prevent and Control Acne

There is a strikingly different occurrence of acne in fully modernized societies compared to populations with non-westernized diets.That’s what a study by Colorado State University researchers found.

Their study, entitled “Acne vulgaris: A Disease of Western civilization,” was published in the prestigious medical journal Archives of Dermatology (Vol. 138, pages 1584- 1590).

The researchers studied acne incidence in two populations: the Aché tribe of hunter-gatherers of Paraguay and the Kitavan Islanders of Papula, New Guinea. Not a single papule, pustule, or open comedone was observed during examinations for skin disorders in the entire Kitavan population, about 1,200 people. Of the 115 subjects in the hunter/gatherer tribe from Aché, Paraguay, no active cases of acne vulgaris were observed.

The non-westernized diets of both the Kitavan Islanders and the hunter/gatherers of Aché, Paraguay, consist of minimally-processed plant/animal foods, which are virtually devoid of western carbohydrates that lead to high glycemic levels which, in turn elevate insulin levels. Those two nonwesternized populations eat a naturally low glycemic diet and as a result maintain low blood sugars, healthy weights, and appear full of energy all day long.

Wow! Isn’t that a piece of interesting news!

It’s news that affects you because you can use the Glycemic Index (the GI) to lose weight, achieve healthy blood sugars, and control acne.

The Glycemic Index measures the potential of carbohydrate foods – and various combinations of carbohydrate and noncarbohydrate foods – to cause rapid increases in blood sugar. These blood sugar spikes are known as the glycemic load (GL).

The importance of the GL is a little-known secret.

Accumulating evidence suggests that low GI/GL diets may have a role in the prevention of diabetes, obesity, and – surprisingly – acne!

In study after study, scientists have been praising the healthy effects of low GI/GL eating. For instance, to study the effects of a low glycemic diet, researchers from the School of Applied Sciences of Australia’s Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology did a 12-week double blind randomized study. Participants ate two types of diets – 25 males (the control group) were allowed to eat carbohydrate dense (high glycemic) foods. The other group of 25 men followed a low glycemic diet. Before the study began, acne counts were made for each participant.

The results: After adjusting for variables, the reduction in total pimples and pus-filled pustules was significantly greater statistically in the low glycemic group compared to the control group.

The researchers also noted a greater reduction in total weight and body mass in low GI group!

Their article, published in 2007 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, had the tongue twisting title, “The effect of a high-protein, low glycemic-load diet versus a conventional, high glycemic-load diet on biochemical parameters associated with acne vulgaris: A randomized investigator-masked, controlled trial.” (Vol. 57, pages 247-256).

The medical literature reveals still other studies that back up the health effects of low glycemic eating. For instance, in 2003 in a medical journal named Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, medical researchers wrote:

“In clinical studies, low-GL diets produced less hunger, promoted more weight loss, and improved markers of glycemic control and cardiovascular disease risk compared to the usual, high-GL (glycemic load) diet.”

They entitled their article, “A Proposal for a New National Diet” (Vol. 1, issue 3, pages 199-208).

Copyright © 2008

This column can be reprinted without changes only if the source is acknowledged as http://www.lowglycemicrecipes.net/

Posted by on October 13th, 2008

What Scientists Say About Low Glycemic Foods

By Maury M. Breecher, PhD, MPH

Read what scientists have to say about the low glycemic index lifestyle:

“Low GI and low GL diets are independently associated with a reduced risk of certain chronic diseases. In diabetes and heart disease, the protection is comparable with that seen for whole grain and high fiber intakes.” – Barclay, AW, et al., American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008 March;87(3):627-637.

So, how important is fiber?

It is quite important. The recipes I recommend are generally high in fiber. However the health promoting effects of these recipes cannot be ascribed simply to fiber – it’s the low glycemic effect that is just as important.

For instance, Dutch scientists, after a study of low glycemic foods in their country, concluded: “In this population, a low-GI diet … low in potatoes and cereals, is associated with improved insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism and reduced chronic inflammation” – Du H, van der A DL et al., American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008 March 87(3)655-61. This is especially important to people with diabetes or who are pre-diabetic because insulin resistance and high lipids generally walk hand-in-hand with Type 2 diabetes.

“The best evidence of the clinical usefulness of GI is available in diabetic patients in whom low-GI foods have consistently shown beneficial effects on blood glucose control in both the short-term and the long-term,” wrote world famous Italian researchers at the Frederico II University, Naples.

“In these patients, low-GI foods are suitable as short-term and long-term” – Riccardi, G., Rivellese AA, & Glacco R. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008 Jan;87(1):269S-274S

Even if you don’t have diabetes, you may have a health problem if you carry too many pounds. Low glycemic foods help in weight reduction, according to scientists at the University of Sydney. They did what is known as a “meta-analysis” – a study of other studies, in this case, six randomized controlled trials that compared a low GI diet to other diets including high GI diets.

They concluded: Lowering the glycemic load of the diet appears to be an effective method of promoting weight loss and improving lipid profiles and can be simply incorporated into a person’s lifestyle”—Thomas EE, Elliott EJ, & Baur L., Cochrane Database System Reviews 2007 July 18;(3):CD005105.

Copyright © 2011

This column can be reprinted without changes only if the source is acknowledged as http://www.lowglycemicrecipes.net/

Posted by on September 9th, 2008